Stonebroke Kennels
100% Field Bred English Springer Spaniels

Your Pups Health

26962_1426196936324_5883405_n

Vaccinations:

Your pup will have received its first shot at 6 weeks of age (5-way vaccine for Parvo, Distemmper, etc.). Generally speaking, pups should receive a booster shot at 9, 12, and 15 weeks and their first rabies vaccine at 4 months of age. Most vets recommend an annual booster shot. Another rabies shot should be given at one year of age and every 3 years after that. Check with your vet on what vaccinations are appropriate for where you live. Keep in mind that vaccine is not 100% effective. Vaccine provides excellent protection, but it’s very important to not expose your puppy to areas frequented by other dogs (rest areas, dog parks, etc.) until he is older and has had all of his vaccinations.

Internal Parasites:

Your pup will have been wormed at least twice before you pick him up. Puppies are born with roundworms. The larvae lays dormant in the mother until she becomes pregnant. Hormonal changes activate the larvae. We worm the mother after she has been bred and after the pups are born. You may have to have your pup wormed again after you take him home. Please have your vet check a stool sample. Puppies pick up worms and other internal parasites very easily despite efforts to prevent them, but fortunately they are easily treated and rarely present a serious problem. When your pup gets older he may pick up a tapeworm. If your pup finds a dead rabbit, deer bones, etc. when you are out and about they can pick up tapeworms from these. You may not even notice it, but quite often small segments of the tapeworms will show up in your dog’s stools. Feeding raw deer meat can cause tapeworms also. We worm our adult dogs after hunting season every year and as needed throughout the year.

Delayed Closure of the Umbilical Ring:

From time to time we see what is called a “delayed closure of the umbilical ring”. Many people call these umbilical hernias, but they are not true hernias and they will close on their own as the pup grows. We see them from time to time in some litters, but not others. From what I’ve read, they are not genetic in nature. They are not serious and do not require medical attention.. Here is a link that talks about them in detail: http://www.showdogsupersite.com/kenlclub/breedvet/umbilical.html

General Health of Your Pup:

A clean, dry pup is a healthy pup. Give your pup a quality dog food,fresh clean water, and clean living quarters and you will have very few health problems. All dog foods have recommended daily portions, but this is just a general guideline. Feed your pup based on your pup’s condition…if he appears too heavy, cut back on his food. If he is very thin, increase his daily ration. Every pup is different…some will wolf down their food and will eat however much you put in front of them while others will pick at it.

You’ll need to decide if your pup is going to live in the house with you or outside in a kennel run..There are advantage and disadvantages to both, of course. Our dogs spend time in the house, but are primarily outdoor dogs. You cannot freeze a dog to death providing they have a good dog house and are acclimated to the cold, but heat will kill them very quickly.. Dogs must have shade if they are outside in the summer. We have heaters in our dog houses, but I’m not convinced they are necessary. I’ve gone outside when it was -38 below zero and the dogs have been sitting on top of their dog houses!!! They could be inside where it’s warm and cozy, but for whatever reason they prefer to be outside. We need to keep in mind that dogs are animals, not people….. They are no different from a fox, coyote, wolf, etc. when it comes to dealing with the weather (providing they are acclimated to the cold!!!). Our dogs are exercised every day regardless of the weather. In the summer when it’s hot, I take them swimming…perfect exercise for hot days.

0-June 5  2013 024

0-Dogs  July 21   2013 024

They love the snow…It doesn’t matter how cold it is…When we go for our walks they’ll roll and dig in the snow.

Echo - - - 023

Ted hunting mice

No Responses to “Your Pups Health”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: